Having A Hard Time With Your Old Hardwood Floors? 3 Things To Know About Refinishing

Laminated wood flooring is one of the most popular hard surface flooring options available today. While laminate flooring products can be beautiful and durable, these newer products still pale in comparison to authentic hardwood flooring that was used in the construction of many older homes. 

While aging and gentle wear can give real hardwood flooring an even more beautiful look, excessively worn or damaged areas can cause it to look shabby and unattractive. If you are living in an older home with equally old hardwood flooring that is beginning to need serious attention, here are some things you should know about wood floor refinishing.

Decide on project budget

Homeowners who are dissatisfied with the state of their existing hardwood flooring will need to determine a feasible budget amount for the project before beginning. Hardwood flooring that is in good structural condition may just need some basic sanding to smooth out minor scratches before stains and sealants are applied. 

If there is water damage, bowing, broken boards, or severe stains or odors, the process will likely require additional time and funds to complete. The amount of square footage involved in the project will also help to determine the costs and time needed to complete the project. 

Homeowners who want to make a large project more manageable may be able to have their hardwood flooring refinished room by room, depending upon the design of the home. 

Some damage may not be repairable

In most instances, the thickness of the hardwood flooring is the determining factor on whether deep gouges and excessively damaged areas can be sanded sufficiently to restore their beauty. Hardwood floors that have undergone extensive refinishing in the past may be too thin to withstand another refinishing project.

Likewise, there are some instances in which hardwood planks may be too damaged to be refinished, including:

  • those that have been warped by humidity or water
  • those with severe pest damage
  • those with severe signs of decay

If the original hardwood is very old or very unique in grain, type of wood, or other features, it may be difficult or even impossible to match with replacement wood. In this situation, homeowners may want to opt to install a new hardwood floor instead of attempting to refinish the existing surface. 

DIY can be risky

Homeowners who are wondering if they could lessen the project's cost by doing it themselves should consider the risk. Improper use of electric sanders can create swirls, depressions, and other damage to the hardwood that may be difficult to repair. 

To learn more, contact a hardwood floor refinishing service. 

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